Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing problem globally and untreatable infections due to resistant organisms are becoming increasingly common. The problem is driven by several factors, including antibiotic overuse in both human and animal health and in food production, deficiencies in infection control in hospitals, and importation of pathogens by travelers and in food imports. Australia’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy was introduced in 2015, with a second strategy under development.

In June 2017, the Australian Society for Antimicrobials (ASA) and the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases (ASID), in partnership with Australasian College of Infection Prevention and Control (ACIPC), hosted the second National Antimicrobial Resistance Summit. Key representatives and stakeholders from state and federal government, research, human healthcare, veterinary and agricultural sectors discussed the way forward to improve the response to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Australia. The key recommendation arising from this was that Australia should, as a priority, develop a central cross-jurisdictional mechanism to coordinate and manage national AMR control activities. We recommend the establishment of a new Australian National Coordinating Centre on Antimicrobial Resistance which is responsible for effective coordination of current and future AMR efforts in human and animal health and agriculture.

Click here for the full letter signed by ASID President A/Professor Joshua Davis, ASA President Ben Howden and ACIPC President Marilyn Cruickshank.

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